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  • The BET Awards continues to make its mark on social TV

    In this week's social TV review from Canvs, the BET Awards proved itself a perennial social TV powerhouse. The show managed to inspire 1.8 million reactions on Twitter (good for 51 percent of this week's total reactions).

    Also capturing the attention - and emotions - of tweeters this week were women's sports. This was thanks to the U.S. Women's Soccer team advancing to and winning the World Cup and Serena Williams powering her way through Wimbledon.

    Below, additional insights from Canvs, followed by an infographic:

    • Hannibal fans are turning to Twitter in an organized way, attempting to find a new life for the canceled NBC drama. The #LoyalFannibal hashtag appeared in 61 percent of all reactions to the show.
    • Teen Wolf gave PLL a run for its money this week. The Monday Teen Wolf premiere garnered 3 times the emotional reactions of the ABC Family mainstay. PLL scared fans more, however. Nearly 9,500 reactions were afraid of some aspect of PLL while only about 7,400 reactions expressed the same toward Teen Wolf.
    • The most emotional moment of the week involved Rihanna caught singing along to a Chris Brown performance from the audience of the BET Awards. In the five minutes surrounding the incident, there were nearly 52,000 reactions: 30 percent loved Rihanna's singalong and 13 percent found it funny.

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    Reaction Source: Canvs. Canvs analyzes Tweets about TV (as captured by Nielsen), identifies Tweets containing emotions, and arranges them into themes called reactions.

    Tweet Source: Nielsen. Relevant Tweets captured from three hours before, during, and three hours after an episode's initial broadcast, local time.
  • How I got 1 million LinkedIn followers--and how you can too @jtodonnell bit.ly/1MaTnRZ
  • This selfie stick microphone will make reporters look dumb(er)

    The selfie stick is both hugely popular and much maligned. Disney has banned them from its theme parks, for instance. But a (seemingly ill-fated) Indiegogo campaign is trying to turn them into must-have tool for reporters. The $149 Solocam melds a handheld microphone with a selfie stick to create a one-person reporting rig. It looks utterly ridiculous. However, its Israeli creator, Benny Goldstein, claims the HD mic combined with Bluetooth and an app makes it “a studio in the palm of your hand!” So far, it doesn’t seem that many people agree with him. The project has raised just over $9,000 of its…

    This story continues at The Next Web
  • 10 do’s and don’ts of UI and UX design

    This post was brought to you by Adobe and Creative Cloud, building apps that help you design websites and mobile apps faster.
    User experience online is very similar to the user experience you get when going to a grocery store. You want a pleasant time without any hassle. You want to be able to navigate the store quickly, get what you need right away, head to the checkout line without a wait, and get back home. You don’t want to deal with a slow cashier, items not where they should be or out of stock, hostile employees, or a crammed parking lot. You simply want what you came for (groceries) and be on your way. Stores understand this and have spent a considerable…

    This story continues at The Next Web
  • How Social Conversation Can Help You Discover Your Brand’s Next Great Campaign

    In a customer-centric world, social insights are the key to creating effective media partnerships, blog posts, commercials and more, says columnist John Donnelly III.

    Please visit Marketing Land for the full article.
  • Doppler Labs Lands $17 Million In Series B

    Doppler Labs, the same team that brought you the Dubs mechanical ear plug and the Here Active Listening system, is today announcing the close of a $17 million Series B funding round, led by The Chernin Group, Wildcat Capital Management and Acequia Capital. Live National Entertainment, Universal Music Group and WME also participated in the round. Doppler Labs was first founded by Noah Kraft… Read More
  • Harry’s Raises $75.6 Million In Series C, Valued At $750 Million Post Money

    Harry’s, the direct-to-consumer mens’ razor company, has just announced the close of a $75.6 million Series C funding round led by Wellington Management. A source confirmed with TechCrunch that the company is valued at $750 million after money. The Harry’s business might seem simple on the surface. The company sells razors over the internet, both on a one-off basis and as… Read More
  • 7 Free Tools That Will Shave Hours Off of Social Media Management @tweetjohnhall bit.ly/1JLI19z
  • 24 Hours in Advertising: Tuesday, July 7, 2015

    With a big win over Japan in the World Cup Final, the U.S. Women's National team hopes to keep the soccer momentum alive in the states, while brands look to star Carli Lloyd for endorsements. Plus, brands celebrate the return of Shark Week.

    ───────────────────────────────────

    New on Adweek:

    How U.S. Women's National team will keep momentum
    After an impressive World Cup win, National Women's Soccer League commissioner Jeff Plush spoke to Adweek about how he plans to keep people excited about the league.

    Nike celebrates strong women in Moscow
    As part of the "Better for It" campaign for Nike, Wieden + Kennedy Amsterdam created a new set of dramatic spots, alongside some outdoor ads and GIFs.

    Brands will jump to get Carli Lloyd on their teams
    After the U.S. Women's National team won the Women's World Cup, with big help from player Carli Lloyd, brands will most likely turn to the soccer star for endorsements.

    Athletes make a better match to sell men's grooming products
    While actresses are a good choice to sell beauty brands, men prefer to see athletes, not celebrities, as the face of their grooming brands.

    Brands celebrate Shark Week
    Big-name brands from McDonald's to Red Bull were tweeting about Discovery's Shark Week, proving the week of programs has become somewhat of a national holiday.

    ───────────────────────────────────

    Around the Web:

    American Apparel to close some stores
    American Apparel will close a handful of underperforming stores and will also cut jobs, according to new CEO Paula Schneider. (USA Today)

    Starbucks bumps up prices
    A number of coffee drinks at Starbucks will get price hikes, between 5 to 20 cents. Small and large regular cups of coffee, for example, will cost 10 cents more. (NBC News)

    Oreo hopes for a more adult image
    The cookie company announced it plans to release a new, more adult type of Oreo cookie called Oreo Thins. Three of the slimmer cookies will have 140 calories, rather than 160 calories. (Time)

    Twitter uses balloons to get data from users
    In a move to get more data from users, Twitter will start showing a string of balloons on users' profiles on their birthdays. (Tech Crunch)

    Meet Marvel's marketing team
    Marvel Entertainment also houses a content marketing agency, helping brands including Benefits Cosmetics and Lexus create custom Marvel-centered campaigns. (The Wall Street Journal)

    ───────────────────────────────────

    Industry Shake-ups:

    Sid Lee sells to Kyu
    Montreal-based agency Sid Lee made moves to enter into Asia, selling to Kyu, a unit of Hakuhodo in Japan. (Adweek)
  • Jos van Haastrecht (DSM): “Purposeful branding betekent keuzes maken”

    DSM ademt wetenschap en innovatie. Meer dan 18 procent van de omzet komt voort uit innovatieve producten. En dat terwijl in het algemene marktbeeld de meeste innovatieve producten falen, omdat zij geen blijvende markt kunnen vinden. Hoe speelt DSM succesvol in op een constant veranderende wereld? “Wetenschap is de ruggengraat van ons bedrijf en een belangrijke pijler van onze merkbelofte ‘Bright Science. Brighter Living.’ Met onze bright science creëren we toegevoegde waarde voor onze stakeholders en de maatschappij (brighter living)”, licht director global brand, digital and communications Jos van Haastrecht toe. Namens NIMA Young Professionals interviewde ik Jos van Haastrecht over het merk DSM en het vertalen van maatschappelijke behoeften in kansen.
  • 24 Hours in Advertising: Tuesday, July 7, 2015

    With a big win over Japan in the World Cup Final, the U.S. Women's National team hopes to keep the soccer momentum alive in the states, while brands look to star Carli Lloyd for endorsements. Plus, brands celebrate the return of Shark Week.

    ───────────────────────────────────

    New on Adweek:

    How U.S. Women's National team will keep momentum
    After an impressive World Cup win, National Women's Soccer League commissioner Jeff Plush spoke to Adweek about how he plans to keep people excited about the league.

    Nike celebrates strong women in Moscow
    As part of the "Better for It" campaign for Nike, Wieden + Kennedy Amsterdam created a new set of dramatic spots, alongside some outdoor ads and GIFs.

    Brands will jump to get Carli Lloyd on their teams
    After the U.S. Women's National team won the Women's World Cup, with big help from player Carli Lloyd, brands will most likely turn to the soccer star for endorsements.

    Athletes make a better match to sell men's grooming products
    While actresses are a good choice to sell beauty brands, men prefer to see athletes, not celebrities, as the face of their grooming brands.

    Brands celebrate Shark Week
    Big-name brands from McDonald's to Red Bull were tweeting about Discovery's Shark Week, proving the week of programs has become somewhat of a national holiday.

    ───────────────────────────────────

    Around the Web:

    American Apparel to close some stores
    American Apparel will close a handful of underperforming stores and will also cut jobs, according to new CEO Paula Schneider. (USA Today)

    Starbucks bumps up prices
    A number of coffee drinks at Starbucks will get price hikes, between 5 to 20 cents. Small and large regular cups of coffee, for example, will cost 10 cents more. (NBC News)

    Oreo hopes for a more adult image
    The cookie company announced it plans to release a new, more adult type of Oreo cookie called Oreo Thins. Three of the slimmer cookies will have 140 calories, rather than 160 calories. (Time)

    Twitter uses balloons to get data from users
    In a move to get more data from users, Twitter will start showing a string of balloons on users' profiles on their birthdays. (Tech Crunch)

    Meet Marvel's marketing team
    Marvel Entertainment also houses a content marketing agency, helping brands including Benefits Cosmetics and Lexus create custom Marvel-centered campaigns. (The Wall Street Journal)

    ───────────────────────────────────

    Industry Shake-ups:

    Sid Lee sells to Kyu
    Montreal-based agency Sid Lee made moves to enter into Asia, selling to Kyu, a unit of Hakuhodo in Japan. (Adweek)
  • With sales declining, American Apparel redirects bit.ly/1CXZ8gF
  • Marketing Week partners with Innate Motion for brand and music activist event

    Marketing Week has partnered with ad agency Innate Motion for the upcoming ‘The Sound of Change’ event, which will explore how marketers can learn from musicians when it comes to appealing to millennials and generation z.
  • Les Français, fans de jeux marketing

    Selon une étude Actiplay, 75% des joueurs français de jeux marketing sont des hyper consommateurs, qui jouent surtout le soir et chez eux.
  • Les données, chance marketing des clubs

    Nul besoin d'être une grande marque ou une grosse structure pour profiter des avantages de la data. Exemple avec les clubs sportifs et analyse de Benoît Sevel, fondateur de l'agence Smart Solutions.
  • 10 Stupid Phrases the Worst Bosses Love to Use @jeff_haden bit.ly/1JLEs3g
  • Mobile Maker Jolla Splits In Two, With Sailfish OS Its First Order Of Business

    Software or hardware? Finnish mobile device and Sailfish OS maker Jolla has always intended doing both. But that could be changing. Today the company announced it’s forking itself, splitting its business into two. One of those businesses will be fully focused on pushing its Sailfish software platform forward. Read More
  • Teads MD defends Co-Op & Kuoni pulling ads from Rihanna music video as explicit and gratuitous content can 'devalue a brand’s creative'

    Major brands have pulled their adverts from Rihanna's latest music video 'Bitch Better Have My Money (Explicit)' on Vevo's YouTube channel, apparently unhappy to be associated with the content which features explicit language, violence and nudity.

    The seven-minute video shows the popstar abduct and ransom the wife of an accountant who wronged her. The topless woman is threatened, beaten, bound and hung upside down, while Rihanna attempts to extract money from the man, who she eventually chainsaws to death.

    It has split viewers - some argue it is empowering, others state it is mindlessly violent. The Guardian’s Rebecca Carroll even argued the racial imagery was responsible for the complaints in a piece entitled 'Rihanna's video puts a black woman in control – no wonder there's a backlash'.

    Regardless of the intent or purpose of the music video, travel firm Kuoni and the Co-Op were among the first firms to pull their ads from the Vevo video on YouTube.

    On the removal Kuoni said that it did not want the brand appearing next to explicit content. The Co-Op similarly said it did not want to be “associated with” the video.

    Commenting on the brands' responses, Justin Taylor, UK managing director of video advertising firm Teads, said: “It’s completely understandable that Kuoni and the Co-operative Group are frustrated after having their advertisements run before Rihanna’s music video.

    “It’s only right that when paying for placements, brands have complete control and transparency about the content which surrounds their ads. Explicit or violent content might work for some brands, but they should have a choice about whether or not they run ads alongside it.”

    He said that research backs the hypothesis that "where an advert appears can drastically affect how a consumer reacts to a brand," adding "it can devalue a brand’s creative rather than enhance it".

    In order to avoid content and brand clashes in video advertising, Taylor suggested "asking for site lists, running verification tools and looking at alternative advertising formats".

    Check out the video below. Needless to say, it is NSFW.
  • DVR – the key for next generation OTT TV is in the clouds

    With the growth of OTT TV, multiple screen viewing and cord cutting catching on in the U.S., it is unsurprising that what matters in the world of video, TV and advertisers is converging. For instance, in a recent report from June 2015, Forrester Research found that “lack of premium inventory is holding back digital video monetization.” Meanwhile eMarketer published a report about how US adults divide their TV screen time, showing that overall, video time continues to increase. While TV dipped a bit, time spent watching on connected devices more than tripled in 4 years.

    So on one hand, advertisers are willing to pay 3x CPM, as their video-spending budget grows at the expense of search and display ads and on the other, viewers are craving content not just on TV, but on mobile devices.

    What is the solution that can satisfy both advertisers and viewers? Cloud-DVR.

    Cloud-DVR is the biggest differentiator between early OTT deployments (that mainly offer live, some VOD and limited discovery) to next-generation deployments (with advanced time-shifted TV, business model flexibility and full mobile device support). Cloud-DVR is arguably the killer-app that holds all the keys to unlocking the full potential of OTT delivery that will revolutionize our industry.

    Cloud-DVR is seemingly simple – it allows end-users to record content on the cloud (instead of their set-top boxes or other hardware devices) and stream the content back on demand at any time. But Cloud DVR is anything but simple, and it has great benefits to all players in the TV consumption food chain.

    Service providers can now let go of the expensive set-top boxes with their massive hard-drives, which require much investment and maintenance. Moving the storage to the cloud will allow for more storage with higher CPU for a lower price. Furthermore, service providers will be able to improve margins by offering Cloud-DVR users to pay extra for additional recording quota.

    Content providers can set a new price for allowing their content to be Cloud-DVR’ed and downloaded for later viewing. In addition, with dynamic ad-insertion, VOD content can be monetized like never before.

    Viewers will have the option to record an endless number of shows, watch them later on any device and also download content to view offline.

    Advertisers can get access to more premium content inventory, as fresh and targeted ads can be dynamically inserted in cloud-recorded shows. Advertisers will also benefit from advanced mobile delivery that can easily ban the ability to fast-forward ads and better track engagement.

    Storage Challenges are (almost) Solved

    Historically, OTT vendors and operators faced challenges that impacted widespread adoption of Cloud-DVR solutions. We are now finally in a place where these hurdles are about to be overcome, including the most pressing one - storage. There are now a few approaches that help obliterate this obstacle, including having service providers record a rolling-buffer of linear channels and enable users to access their recorded shows based on queue point on that one long file. Another approach is to use a combination of core and edge storage with just-in-time transcoding, in order to reduce storage costs. In the US, where shared copies are not allowed, the leading OTT vendors experiment with storing individual copies in offline storage while streaming to users a cached (shared) copy.

    Utilizing such technologies, we expect to see several tier-1 deployments offering Cloud-DVR in Europe and Asia by the Fall. Based on the potential benefits of Cloud-DVR to all aspects of the OTT food chain, 2016 will likely be an even bigger year for the industry with accelerated growth for publishers and service providers alike.

    Iddo Shai is a Director, Product Marketing for Kaltura, an open source video platform.
  • The top ten shows on ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC in May 2015

    Each week we've been taking a unique look at interesting data about television with SimilarWeb. The first week we looked at the top pirated shows and last week we looked at the top shows on Netflix and Hulu. For this week's analysis, we take a dive into the top shows on the major broadcast networks' websites (ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC). As the traditional channels start transforming to OTT properties as well, the top shows on their websites could be as telling as ratings.

    Here's analysis from SimilarWeb:

    • Reality shows remain popular on all the major networks online, but ABC has two of them. Survivor,The Amazing Race, and The Bachelorette continue to secure huge interest from fans more than a decade after they first aired.
    • Comedies and sitcoms also have a loyal Internet following. Fox has five that made the network’s Top 10 list in May. The network’s The Simpsons, Family Guy, and Bob’s Burgers were the only animated sitcoms to make any of the networks’ Top 10 lists.
    • Crime shows continue to enjoy strong support from fans. NBC has three of them: Law and Order SVU, The Blacklist, and Chicago PD. CBS’s Scorpion and Elementary, as well as ABC’s Secrets and Lies were also top ranked.
    • Four soap operas made on three different networks made the cut: CBS leads the way with two:The Young and the Restless and The Bold and the Beautiful. NBC’s Days of Our Lives, and ABC’s Revenge round out the list.
    • Talk shows during the day (ABC’s The View) and night (The Late Show on CBS and The Tonight Show on NBC) continue their engaging conversations online.

    SimilarWeb is the leading competitive market intelligence firm providing data analytics on desktop websites, mobile web and mobile apps. The SimilarWeb platform provides PPC, SEO, Media Buyers and Affiliates an edge over the competition with actionable insights into their competitor’s marketing tactics. Discover the data for yourself at SimilarWeb.com, with free insights for any website or mobile app.

    You can access the Found Remote hub here. Sign up to receive The Drum's Daily US newsletter.
  • Record Women’s World Cup final drew 13.3 million viewers on ABC

    The Women’s World Cup final which saw USA defeat Japan in an eventful 5-2 clash drew in a record 13.3 million viewers on ABC.

    Featuring a hat-trick from US star Carli Lloyd, the figure was close to doubling the 8.6 million viewers drawn into the previous final in 2011 which aired on ESPN, showing a growing interest in the sport in the states.

    On the ad front, Fox, which broadcasted 37 matches from the 52-game tournament, generated an impressive $26.8m in ad sales, AdAge quotes from iSpot.tv figures.

    Nationwide, Fiat, Visa, Ford, Bud Light. Audi and Nike were among the biggest advertisers of the Women’s World Cup on Fox.

    Making the ad sale figures even more impressive is the fact that soccer airs in the US with limited ad breaks - unlike other sports such as basketball and football.
  • Mobile Maker Jolla Splits In Two, With Sailfish OS Its First Order Of Business

    Software or hardware? Finnish mobile device and Sailfish OS maker Jolla has always intended doing both. But that could be changing. Today the company announced it’s forking itself, splitting its business into two. One of those businesses will be fully focused on pushing its Sailfish software platform forward. Read More
  • 6 Life Changing Decisions Successful and Happy People Make @jeff_haden bit.ly/1CklUUW
  • Rdio launches its answer to Apple’s Beats 1: Stations from XL, DFA, Blue Note and more

    Rdio has revealed its response to Apple Music and the buzz-heavy Beats 1. The streaming service has set up a series of new stations curated by record labels and influencers. It says its in-house music team has collaborated directly with the new curators to put together recommendations that represent the records that are exciting “local tastemakers.” The stations are available across Rdio’s plans – including free, unlimited and select – and are launching for the first time in Australia, Mexico, Brazil, India, and Asia (Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and Hong Kong). Additional stations have been added in the US,…

    This story continues at The Next Web
  • 5 reasons behind Israel’s startup success

    With a population of eight million people, Israel has over 6,000 startups and attracts more venture capital per person than any other country in the world. The Israeli startup scene extends from the tech hub of Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and all the way to the southern desert city of Beersheba. The country’s success story can be traced back to many complementary or competing factors. I recently wrote about 10 Israeli startups to watch in 2015 and while it’s interesting to observe the individual movers and shakers, it’s fascinating to delve deeper into the underlying factors that have produced Israel’s highly…

    This story continues at The Next Web
  • Is YP's Search Data Strong Enough to Win More Local Digital Ad Dollars?

    A few years ago, Foursquare, Yelp and Groupon seemed to be booming with brands and consumers, painting a pretty lucrative picture of the future of local advertising. Fast-forward to today—Yelp is reportedly up for sale, Foursquare's growth has stalled, and the daily-deal market has burned out.

    Just as the future of local digital advertising looks like an uphill struggle again, YP is transitioning from its roots in print phone books to mobile and display advertising with what it claims is a lot of data to please both small businesses and big brands. At the same time, YP is up against giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google that now also have their sights set on local advertising.

    "We see this tension [in small businesses], as well in the national players, between search and display," said Darren Clark, YP's chief technology officer. "More and more, we think they converge and complement each other. We have really good visibility into when customers are looking for stuff. Our ability to retarget off of that gives us a leg up in terms of attribution and all the things that can be in a big media plan."

    Today, YP is launching a new mobile and online ad product for small businesses called ypDisplay, which lets marketers zero in on potential customers who have shown an interest in a product. The tool enables small- to medium-sized marketers to run geo-fenced mobile campaigns around places like car dealerships and malls. Brands will be able to pinpoint folks who searched for similar products to serve display ads to later.

    Marketers can buy promos for YP's properties as well as for ad networks like AppNexus and Verve to reach wider audiences. Clark explained that ypDisplay is reliant on small businesses that have already invested in content (like websites and listings) and search advertising, two additional services YP provides.

    "The last piece [for small businesses] is display—where it's about audience," he said. "Not only does it drive brand awareness for these local businesses, but it also enhances the performance of their search campaign."

    Sophisticated buying tactics like geo-conquesting and search retargeting are nothing new for big brands, but it's a relatively advanced tactic for mom-and-pop shops that don't have sizable budgets or extensive digital know-how, Clark said.

    Digital Is the New Phone Book
    The new ad offering is YP's latest step in moving away from print. Just three weeks ago, the Los Angeles-based company announced plans to spin off its print business into a separate company called Print Media LLC.

    The split signals YP may soon kill off print, altogether. But that may not be a bad thing, said Matt Naeger, evp of digital strategy at Merkle. Unlike other digital players vying for a piece of the local-search market, YP could benefit from its sales teams that traditionally work closely with businesses to run campaigns.

    "The local pizza shop doesn't run its own search campaign," Naeger said. "Google is trying to address that problem, too, with sales forces that go out to those businesses. But that's where the YPs of the world have an added advantage because they've been doing it for decades."

    YP separates its digital ad products between small businesses and big brands. Just like the small-business arm, YP also runs geo-targeted ads for big brands. In 2013, it opened a national-sales office in New York to build closer relationships with advertisers and brands.

    The local-search player's revenue backs up its digital push. Mobile makes up half, or $500 million, of YP's digital revenue. And a 2014 report from IDC ranked YP No. 5 in mobile search, after Google, Microsoft, Twitter and Yahoo.

    YP claims 7.2 percent of the mobile-search market, a number that, at first glance, seems tiny but is actually a sizable share. Google controls 46 percent of mobile-search money, followed by Microsoft with 11.3 percent. Twitter and Yahoo own 17.8 percent of the market. All other search players combined make up the remaining 17.7 percent.

    Those numbers mean Google is a double-edged sword for YP. Since the company only controls a sliver of the search market, it leans heavily on Google and Bing to drive traffic to its sites.

    According to comScore, YP had 57 million mobile and desktop visitors in June 2014. In May 2015, that number dropped to 48 million.

    "They are either buying their traffic or optimizing their traffic," Naeger said. "They don't have the device penetration that Google, Bing or Apple have at this point."

    Abid Chaudhry, an analyst at BIA/Kelsey, agreed that YP's search traffic largely relies on Google and Bing but also pointed to its partnership with Yelp as an example of how more consumers are searching for local restaurants and shops through apps instead of search engines.

    "It's not exactly the greatest amount of traffic in terms of volume, but it's very specialized [traffic]," Chaudhry said. "They're still pretty reliant on the big players in order to maintain that flow that they need to make retargeting, display and even the mobile-ad network feasible. But I think that's going to change over time."

    At the same time, YP also faces massive competition in mobile, particularly with location-based ads. Other companies like NinthDecimal, xAd and Placed already specialize in niche targeting. Each company has its own twist that hones in on specific markets, but marketers complain about the quality of data and small scale of the campaigns.

    YP's search data is rich for targeting, though, said Jennifer Wise, an analyst at Forrester Research.

    "They're planning to tie their search data from across devices to inform the location targeting," Wise said. "They're able to layer on the intent that was signaled by a search to then target the right user when they're in the right location."

    Meanwhile, Facebook and Google are also clamoring to win over local advertisers with promos that drive sales. "The question is, 'Is the data that YP has from search and from the inferred intent better than what Google or Facebook has?'" Wise said.

    If the answer is yes, Wise said, she imagines that big marketers like consumer packaged-goods brands will want the same type of granular targeting.

    "A big brand may now be interested in YP if someone is searching for CPG products," she explained. "If I'm Pampers, I can now begin to use that data to target [moms] when they're by Target."

    BIA/Kelsey's Chaudhry said he could see YP working directly with big brands, eventually, similar to how it works with small businesses that don't hire agencies. It's part of a bigger trend where tech and media brands like Vox and AOL have set up branded content studios to build campaigns for marketers.

    "I do think that there is going to be a tipping point where YP decides that they don't necessarily need to have the agency middleman in order to work with these large brands or these multilocation businesses," Chaudhry said. "I wouldn't say it's a significant part yet, but they're getting there."
  • Digital Summer School 2015 #adv

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  • Is YP's Search Data Strong Enough to Win More Local Digital Ad Dollars?

    A few years ago, Foursquare, Yelp and Groupon seemed to be booming with brands and consumers, painting a pretty lucrative picture of the future of local advertising. Fast-forward to today—Yelp is reportedly up for sale, Foursquare's growth has stalled, and the daily-deal market has burned out.

    Just as the future of local digital advertising looks like an uphill struggle again, YP is transitioning from its roots in print phone books to mobile and display advertising with what it claims is a lot of data to please both small businesses and big brands. At the same time, YP is up against giants like Facebook, Amazon and Google that now also have their sights set on local advertising.

    "We see this tension [in small businesses], as well in the national players, between search and display," said Darren Clark, YP's chief technology officer. "More and more, we think they converge and complement each other. We have really good visibility into when customers are looking for stuff. Our ability to retarget off of that gives us a leg up in terms of attribution and all the things that can be in a big media plan."

    Today, YP is launching a new mobile and online ad product for small businesses called ypDisplay, which lets marketers zero in on potential customers who have shown an interest in a product. The tool enables small- to medium-sized marketers to run geo-fenced mobile campaigns around places like car dealerships and malls. Brands will be able to pinpoint folks who searched for similar products to serve display ads to later.

    Marketers can buy promos for YP's properties as well as for ad networks like AppNexus and Verve to reach wider audiences. Clark explained that ypDisplay is reliant on small businesses that have already invested in content (like websites and listings) and search advertising, two additional services YP provides.

    "The last piece [for small businesses] is display—where it's about audience," he said. "Not only does it drive brand awareness for these local businesses, but it also enhances the performance of their search campaign."

    Sophisticated buying tactics like geo-conquesting and search retargeting are nothing new for big brands, but it's a relatively advanced tactic for mom-and-pop shops that don't have sizable budgets or extensive digital know-how, Clark said.

    Digital Is the New Phone Book
    The new ad offering is YP's latest step in moving away from print. Just three weeks ago, the Los Angeles-based company announced plans to spin off its print business into a separate company called Print Media LLC.

    The split signals YP may soon kill off print, altogether. But that may not be a bad thing, said Matt Naeger, evp of digital strategy at Merkle. Unlike other digital players vying for a piece of the local-search market, YP could benefit from its sales teams that traditionally work closely with businesses to run campaigns.

    "The local pizza shop doesn't run its own search campaign," Naeger said. "Google is trying to address that problem, too, with sales forces that go out to those businesses. But that's where the YPs of the world have an added advantage because they've been doing it for decades."

    YP separates its digital ad products between small businesses and big brands. Just like the small-business arm, YP also runs geo-targeted ads for big brands. In 2013, it opened a national-sales office in New York to build closer relationships with advertisers and brands.

    The local-search player's revenue backs up its digital push. Mobile makes up half, or $500 million, of YP's digital revenue. And a 2014 report from IDC ranked YP No. 5 in mobile search, after Google, Microsoft, Twitter and Yahoo.

    YP claims 7.2 percent of the mobile-search market, a number that, at first glance, seems tiny but is actually a sizable share. Google controls 46 percent of mobile-search money, followed by Microsoft with 11.3 percent. Twitter and Yahoo own 17.8 percent of the market. All other search players combined make up the remaining 17.7 percent.

    Those numbers mean Google is a double-edged sword for YP. Since the company only controls a sliver of the search market, it leans heavily on Google and Bing to drive traffic to its sites.

    According to comScore, YP had 57 million mobile and desktop visitors in June 2014. In May 2015, that number dropped to 48 million.

    "They are either buying their traffic or optimizing their traffic," Naeger said. "They don't have the device penetration that Google, Bing or Apple have at this point."

    Abid Chaudhry, an analyst at BIA/Kelsey, agreed that YP's search traffic largely relies on Google and Bing but also pointed to its partnership with Yelp as an example of how more consumers are searching for local restaurants and shops through apps instead of search engines.

    "It's not exactly the greatest amount of traffic in terms of volume, but it's very specialized [traffic]," Chaudhry said. "They're still pretty reliant on the big players in order to maintain that flow that they need to make retargeting, display and even the mobile-ad network feasible. But I think that's going to change over time."

    At the same time, YP also faces massive competition in mobile, particularly with location-based ads. Other companies like NinthDecimal, xAd and Placed already specialize in niche targeting. Each company has its own twist that hones in on specific markets, but marketers complain about the quality of data and small scale of the campaigns.

    YP's search data is rich for targeting, though, said Jennifer Wise, an analyst at Forrester Research.

    "They're planning to tie their search data from across devices to inform the location targeting," Wise said. "They're able to layer on the intent that was signaled by a search to then target the right user when they're in the right location."

    Meanwhile, Facebook and Google are also clamoring to win over local advertisers with promos that drive sales. "The question is, 'Is the data that YP has from search and from the inferred intent better than what Google or Facebook has?'" Wise said.

    If the answer is yes, Wise said, she imagines that big marketers like consumer packaged-goods brands will want the same type of granular targeting.

    "A big brand may now be interested in YP if someone is searching for CPG products," she explained. "If I'm Pampers, I can now begin to use that data to target [moms] when they're by Target."

    BIA/Kelsey's Chaudhry said he could see YP working directly with big brands, eventually, similar to how it works with small businesses that don't hire agencies. It's part of a bigger trend where tech and media brands like Vox and AOL have set up branded content studios to build campaigns for marketers.

    "I do think that there is going to be a tipping point where YP decides that they don't necessarily need to have the agency middleman in order to work with these large brands or these multilocation businesses," Chaudhry said. "I wouldn't say it's a significant part yet, but they're getting there."
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  • Pass us a Kleenex: The brand’s new messaging hits an emotional note

    As a pioneer in its category, Kleenex has long been synonymous with facial tissues. But the Kimberly-Clark brand doesn’t just want to be your defense against a runny nose or your go-to for wiping your tears; it wants to be a bigger symbol of care that brings people closer together. With its new campaign the brand is seeking to further cement its status as “a broader tool for a range of situations," said Eric Higgs, gm for Kleenex.

    The post Pass us a Kleenex: The brand’s new messaging hits an emotional note appeared first on Digiday.
  • Follow-up mails: zo win je klanten terug die hun online winkelmandje achterlaten

    Voordat ze bij de kassa komen, ligt het gemiddelde percentage klanten dat zijn winkelmandje achterlaat op 69 procent. Dit stelt het Baymard Intituut, een Deens instituut dat grootschalig onderzoek doet naar de bruikbaarheid van e-commerce. Doelgerichte e-mails naar deze klantengroep bieden groot potentieel. Het verloop en afronden van een bestelling kan vaak gestimuleerd worden door […]
  • How to Cite Sources & Not Steal People's Content on the Internet

    The best content marketers aren't afraid to share. Share content. Share links. Share ideas. Share data.

    The thing is, sometimes marketers get a little protective of their stuff because there are less-than-scrupulous people out there who take content and then try to pass it off as their own. All that hard work, and none of the credit. Not cool, less-than-scrupulous people. Not cool.
  • SMMday 2015: cosa cercavamo e cosa abbiamo trovato

    Il web è il mondo della tempestività, il luogo in cui il tempo scorre a velocità moltiplicata e nel tempo di un battito di ciglia avvengono piccole grandi rivoluzioni. E tempestività non poteva che essere tra le parole chiave del Social Media Marketing Day (SMMday), sia perché il titolo dell’evento non poteva promettere nulla di diverso -il […]

    Continua Lettura

    Continua lettura dell' articolo SMMday 2015: cosa cercavamo e cosa abbiamo trovato - Inside Marketing.
  • Athens-founded Transifex Raises $4M In Series A, Led by Toba Capital

    Amid the craziness of Greece right now, at least some startups are still ‘keeping on keeping on’. To that end, localisation software startup Transifex has secured $4 million in Series A funding, led by Toba Capital with participation from seed VC investors NEA, Arafura Ventures and angels including Parse founder and CEO, Ilya Sukhar. The amount raised to date is $6.5 million.… Read More
  • Brand of the Day: New York City FC

    The newest team in Major League Soccer, New York City FC, have signed yet another big named star this week in the form of Italian talisman Andrea Pirlo. The 36 year-old Juventus and Italy midfielder will join Man City’s Frank Lampard and former Barcelona striker David Villa at the Eastern Conference club on 21 July.

    Out of the 20 teams competing in the MLS, New York City FC are currently sitting in 16th position in the league standings with their city rivals New York Red Bulls three points ahead.

    The new club have been subjected to widespread criticism since their establishment form both fans and football analysts. The signing of Frank Lampard was one of the most controversial because the England midfielder was supposed to have joined the team at the beginning of their season in March however part owners Manchester City decided to extend his loan spell at Manchester City, meaning their star signing has missed the majority of the season.

    Here’s more on the New York City FC brand.

    Former captain of the US national team, Claudio Reyna, is the club's director of football and its first employee. During his career Renya played for Manchester City as well as NYC FC’s rivals New York Red Bulls.

    Claudio Reyna

    Claudio Reyna

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    The club is owned by a joint partnership with Manchester City Football Club and the New York Yankees. Manchester City is the majority owner of the club and the Yankees has a minority stake as an investor and is an active member of the ownership group.

    NYC FC deal

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    The franchise cost a reported $100m (£66m) to join the MLS, which is around a third of the market value of Barcelona’s Lionel Messi.

    MLS

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    The badge was designed by New York-based artist Rafael Esquer and was inspired by the old New York City subway token. Fans were given the option to vote between two of Esquer’s designs as well as submitting their own designs which would appear in the club badge mosaic.

    Logo

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    While the club have a three year agreement with their part owners, the Yankees, they have still to find a location to build their own stadium. After numerous location’s being touted, Northern Manhattan is the most recent suggestion and would involve a newly built 25,000 seater stadium costing $400m which would be shared with Columbia University’s football team.

    43,507 at Yankee Stadium for #NYCFC's Historic Home Opener pic.twitter.com/7lEVIvAZ50

    — New York City FC (@NYCFC) March 16, 2015
  • On-the-run man calls demands better police mugshot on Facebook in cheeky exchange

    A man being hunted by Victoria Police responded to a post from the force for information on his location, cheekily asking if they could use a better mugshot.

    As police forces the world over take to social media platforms to benefit from their use in gathering and sending information, such exchanges between crook and cop will likely become more common.

    An appeal from Aussie cops for 25-year-old Daniel Damon for traffic and drug offences went sour after he criticised his mugshot on Facebook.

    Show me entity :: 1002

    In response, Victoria Police invited him to pop in for a new mugshot in a humorous exchange.

    It is believed that Daniel may be living in St Kilda.

    Posted by Victoria Police on Sunday, 5 July 2015

    Police believe the individual is living in the St Kilda area.
  • Need to Know – The latest US media & marketing news: Coca-Cola goes label-less, Women's World Cup nets ratings record & Reddit says sorry

    Morning all, here’s a glimpse at all the media and marketing news you should know today.

    1. Facebook's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg has joined the board of SurveyMonkey, where her late husband was the chief executive, notes Business Insider. Sandberg said she was joining the online polling service to help realize the vision of building a lasting company that impacts the way the world does business.

    2. Donald Trump launched another attack on Mexico on Monday, says the Guardian. The billionaire and presidential candidate, who has already lost out on business with Macy's and NBC due to his stance on immigration, accused Mexicans of being responsible for “tremendous infectious disease... pouring across the border.”

    3. Coca-Cola has gone label-less, asserts MediaPost. In a renewed bid to align itself with global harmony the brand has removed its name from cans of Coke in the Middle East to showcase what it says is an effort to “promote a world without labels and prejudices.”

    4. Fox's coverage of the 2015 Women's World Cup final smashed the all-time ratings record for a stateside soccer audience, according to AdAge. The championship delivered 20.4 million viewers, with the month-long tournament generated $26.8m in ad sales revenue overall.

    5. Google said on Monday that it would start testing a carpooling service in Tel Aviv, writes the New York Times. The offering will be powered through Waze – an Israeli social mapping start-up that the company bought in 2013 for $1bn.

    6. Reddit chief executive Ellen Pao has apologized for the firm’s handling of its dismissal of director of talent Victoria Taylor, says the Washington Post. Following protests from longtime site users, the forum boss said: “We screwed up... We haven’t communicated well, and we have surprised moderators and the community with big changes.”

    7. Procter and Gamble remains the world's largest advertiser, having spent $4.6bn last year. AdAge's annual '200 Leading National Advertisers' report puts the multinational in first place, followed by AT&T and General Motors.

    8. And Twitter wants to know your birthday so it can shower you with balloons and ads. Mashable notes that the social network will now allow users to have their birthdate appear on their profile. The site will use the data to "to show you more relevant content, including ads."

    Stay in the media and marketing news loop at thedrum.com and to receive The Drum's US Daily Newsletter sign up here.
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  • Wikipedia diventa cartacea

    L'artista Michael Mandiberg ha trasformato l'intera versione inglese di Wikipedia in 7600 volumi cartacei.
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